Golf is a game to teach you about the messages from within, about the subtle voices of the body-mind. And once you understand them you can more clearly see your ‘hamartia,’ the ways in which your approach to the game reflects your entire life. Nowhere does a man go so naked.
Michael Murphy, author of “Golf in the Kingdom”
cabinporn:

Caretaker’s cabin on Borestone Mountain, Maine.  
From submitter Jere DeWaters:

The cabin, along with two large lodges and lots of other outbuildings is accessible only by boat after a rough ride or hike up the side of the mountain.  Imagine my surprise to find a full-sized Steinway grand piano in the main room —in tune, too.  The caretaker’s cabin is just big enough for a single bed, writing desk, chair, and fireplace.  The door and window trim are made of spruce bark that has been peeled and soaked in the lake.  When it softens enough it is laid to dry flat and used for ‘sprucing’ up around the doors and windows, so to speak.     


Sound like somewhere you’d like to spent a couple of days in solitude?  I can think of few things more appealing.

cabinporn:

Caretaker’s cabin on Borestone Mountain, Maine.  

From submitter Jere DeWaters:

The cabin, along with two large lodges and lots of other outbuildings is accessible only by boat after a rough ride or hike up the side of the mountain.  Imagine my surprise to find a full-sized Steinway grand piano in the main room —in tune, too.  The caretaker’s cabin is just big enough for a single bed, writing desk, chair, and fireplace.  The door and window trim are made of spruce bark that has been peeled and soaked in the lake.  When it softens enough it is laid to dry flat and used for ‘sprucing’ up around the doors and windows, so to speak.     

Sound like somewhere you’d like to spent a couple of days in solitude?  I can think of few things more appealing.

The one thing in the world, of value, is the active soul. This every man is entitled to; this every man contains within him, although, in almost all men, obstructed, and as yet unborn. The soul active sees absolute truth; and utters truth, or creates. In this action, it is genius; not the privilege of here and there a favorite, but the sound estate of every man. In its essence, it is progressive. The book, the college, the school of art, the institution of any kind, stop with some past utterance of genius. This is good, say they, — let us hold by this. They pin me down. They look backward and not forward. But genius looks forward: the eyes of man are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead: man hopes: genius creates.
The American Scholar – Emerson’s legendary 1837 oration. (via explore-blog)

MIT media lab seeks to create world's first happiness barometer

…provokes interesting questions about “what is happiness?”…

Apparently the face recognition software is sophisticated enough to distinguish the wry smile from the orthodox “happy” one.  But I wonder whether people with the sun in their eyes - squinting - will be picked up as smiling because of the rise in their cheeks?!   

Presumably the MIT folks know what they’re doing.  Their leader, Joicihi Ito, is a legend (I watched a video of his, about the Media Lab, on Edge.org - worth a look folks).

From Amy at Little Hands, a cheek lifting little project out of my own beloved Wullington, Aotearoa. 

As my mate Blair used to say to his late Jack Russel, Dram, “getinbehind…!!!” 

Click here to donate.  Even a meagre Kiwi peso will suffice (they’re edging closer to their $5k fundraising target, to get this thing in print - around $4.4k last time I checked).

These Wullington folks, from Nu Zillin, are my people.  Common People.  (Which strangely enough brings to mind that rousing Pulp track of the same name).

curiositycounts:

It would be this nerd’s absolute dream come true if books grew on trees. But until that happens, Berlin has found a brilliant Giving Tree-esque solution, using fallen trees’ trunks as a free book exchange. Part of the BookCrossing book swap club, which brings free books to public spaces around the globe based on their idea of building the World’s Library! Neighborhood residents are welcome to leave a book they loved, or take one from the plastic protected hutches cut into the tree trunks. 
Love love love it!
via Inhabitat 

It’s little initiatives like this that truly inspire me to come up with other ways to make our lives more social, to have a positive impact on the people in my environment.  How would you enhance your community, if you could be bothered?!

curiositycounts:

It would be this nerd’s absolute dream come true if books grew on trees. But until that happens, Berlin has found a brilliant Giving Tree-esque solution, using fallen trees’ trunks as a free book exchange. Part of the BookCrossing book swap club, which brings free books to public spaces around the globe based on their idea of building the World’s Library! Neighborhood residents are welcome to leave a book they loved, or take one from the plastic protected hutches cut into the tree trunks.

Love love love it!

via Inhabitat 

It’s little initiatives like this that truly inspire me to come up with other ways to make our lives more social, to have a positive impact on the people in my environment.  How would you enhance your community, if you could be bothered?!

curiositycounts:

What could make a morning routine of rocket-fuel grade espresso better? This rad jet-inspired demitasse.

nevver:

Blast off

BOOM

Watch this, inspiring.  This guy’s brilliant.

What makes Pine Valley, “Pine Valley”? Part II: The Course, Obviously.

Recently I made love to Pine Valley.  

That is to say I experienced her with all my senses, drunk in her aromas, sounds, explored her nooks and crannies – essentially, became one with her.  Our orgy was of the nature of surfer and wave, of rider and powder bowl.  Ego played no part.  The experience was as spiritual as it was sensual as it was awe inspiring.  Golf, as we well know, can take us on some quite fantastic journeys.  This was one of them.

So what is it about this infamous Neverland in the Jersey pine barrens that stirs so potently?  Well, in Part I we explored some of the ‘other things’ which make a visit to PV so treasured.  Theirs is a wonderful background music, a faint melody - a worthy accompaniment, to be sure.  It is the centre-piece of the experience, however, the course itself, which elevates a Pine Valley adventure into the most lucid of human endeavours.  But what of it?

Above all, it’s the drama of the place.  Drama may be a word that’s overused in golf literature, so let me go further.  There are two forces constantly at play which, together, create a profound sense of exhilaration as you perambulate the holes.  I’m talking about mystique and peril.

On the internet, someone’s always watching…

I’m no paranoid android, ladies and gentlemen.  But I am present to the fact that when you open Firefox (or your other preferred internet browser, as appropriate) and visit a website - any website - it almost certainly has consequences.  Someone is paying attention to your every move. 

(As much was reinforced for me once again this morning when I’d spent an hour or two bringing myself up to speed - online, of course - on trends in microblogging, social media, collaborative consumption and the like.  I came across several innovative outfits like Local Projects, Wander, Hovding, Whipcar and Stamen Design.  But the hilarious moment came when I was about to post a link to this Tumblog and saw that a good looking girl with some Belgian-sounding alias was now “following me”.  Naturally I clicked on her profile and, after a few seconds, realised that she was somehow connected to - and in some way promoting - a social media crowd called “we heart it”.  The name and the let’s-try-to-create-the-new-“Tweet” idea jarred instantly, which was all the more ironic / funny / serendipitous because only half an hour prior I read this NY Times article).

I must say that, for now at least, my reaction is primarily amusement over objection, or worse, anxiety.  Let them monitor, I say.  They’ll always employ people that are light years smarter than me to devise ways to turn me into data - and that’s just fine; it would be futile, I think, to fight it.

What do you lot think?

I remember this coming out in ‘97 (a big year for me - our family got our first taste of paradise, that is, New Zealand, through a six-month exchange with another family; and infinitely more significantly, we went to Disneyland in Florida).

Funny to reflect on the impact the ‘song’ had on me back then, vis the thoughts and emotions it has now, fifteen years on!  I do find the inevitability of life amusing.